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Teen Writers Critique Group

Teen Writers Critique Group


    Fantasy-Dagan Books: Fish Anthology

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    Joce
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    Posts : 230
    Join date : 2011-08-03
    Age : 18

    Fantasy-Dagan Books: Fish Anthology

    Post by Joce on Sat Aug 06, 2011 10:45 pm

    An entire anthology on fish. Including sharks.

    Submissions: Fantasy
    Flash Fiction (Under 1,000 words)
    Short Stories (1,000-4,000)

    From the site:
    Our next open anthology will begin accepting submissions on June 1, 2011, and we will take stories until August 30, 2011. The theme of this anthology is “Fish”. We want your mythic adventures and modern retellings. We want Dagan, not of Lovecraft but of the Phillistines. We want Ku-ula, of Hawaii, and Hatmehyt, and Nereus with his bounty. We want magic koi in ancient ponds and the street shaman with his fishy avatar, stalking the streets in some odd future. We want sharks, hunting far out at sea. We want carnival goldfish with short-lived secrets.

    Send us something beautiful.
    Submit stories of up to 4,000 words (flash of under 1000 is also encouraged) to:

    submissions@daganbooks.com

    Stories must be sent as a .doc attachment. Do not double space after the end of sentences. Do use paragraphs and tab indents. Do not add an extra line after each paragraph.

    Subject heading must have: [FISH] Story Title, Author Last Name

    This project pays 1 cent per word plus 1% royalty, paid quarterly, for the first two years of the book’s life.

    Please note: we do not publish reprints. Send only original work.


    From Duotrope- An interview with the editors at Dagan Books:
    Q: Describe what you publish in 25 characters or less. [ See other editors' answers to this question ]

    A: Weird, wicked, lovely.
    —Carrie Cuinn, Publisher on 01 May 2011

    Q: What other current publications (or publishers) do you admire most? [ See other editors' answers to this question ]

    A: We have great respect for Small Beer Press, Lightspeed Magazine, Weird Tales magazine, Elder Signs Press, and Clarkesworld Magazine, to name a few.
    —Carrie Cuinn, Publisher on 01 May 2011

    Q: If you publish fiction, who are your favorite fiction writers? If you publish poetry, who are your favorite poets? [ See other editors' answers to this question ]

    A: Of course, we adore our writers, including Cody Goodfellow, Simon C. Larter, Ken Liu, Don Pizarro, Steven James Scearce, K. V. Taylor, and many more. We're also big fans of Kelly Link, Ted Chiang, Neil Gaiman, Sean Stewart, Joe Hill, Karen Joy Fowler, Bruce Sterling, China Mieville, Seanan McGuire, H.P. Lovecraft, and William Shakespeare.
    —Carrie Cuinn, Publisher on 01 May 2011

    Q: What sets your publication apart from others that publish similar material? [ See other editors' answers to this question ]

    A: We only print what we love. We're far more interested in making brilliant books than we are in meeting a production or sales quota, and will take as long as we need to in order to create the best books we possibly can. In addition, we delight in indulging our weird tastes with unusual tales of madness, beauty, and wonder.
    —Carrie Cuinn, Publisher on 01 May 2011

    Q: What is the best advice you can give people who are considering submitting work to your publication? [ See other editors' answers to this question ]

    A: Love reading, and read as much as you can. We do, and can spot a cheap knock-off a mile away. We want original stories, told with finess and creativity, and the more you read, the better chance you have to knowing what that looks like. Most of all, we want your stories! Tell us what you see, how it makes you feel, and show us the world in a way that only you can.
    —Carrie Cuinn, Publisher on 01 May 2011

    Q: Describe the ideal submission. [ See other editors' answers to this question ]

    A: The best submissions are crisp, clean, well-written, clever without being pretentious, lovely without being trite, and posessing a unique perspective. Best of all, they're a joy to read.
    —Carrie Cuinn, Publisher on 01 May 2011

    Q: What do submitters most often get wrong about your submissions process? [ See other editors' answers to this question ]

    A: The biggest mistakes are not reading the submission guidelines, assuming we won't realize when they've turned in a rough draft, or those that attempt to be "modern retellings" of famous stories or characters without adding anything new to the story.
    —Carrie Cuinn, Publisher on 01 May 2011

    Q: How much do you want to know about the person submitting to you? [ See other editors' answers to this question ]

    A: Short story submissions require less of a cover letter than do novel length subs, but the accompanying email still needs to include your real name (note a pen name if you have one but never, never, submit under your pen name alone), contact information, and whether the story has been previously published.
    —Carrie Cuinn, Publisher on 01 May 2011

    Q: How much of a piece do you read before making the decision to reject it? [ See other editors' answers to this question ]

    A: We read each piece submitted, in its entirety. Each submission is read by at least two readers before a decision is made, and may be read by several more before offered acceptance.
    —Carrie Cuinn, Publisher on 01 May 2011

    Q: What additional evaluations, if any, does a piece go though before it is accepted? [ See other editors' answers to this question ]

    A: If a story has technical elements or requires a specialist's knowledge, we may send it out for expert reading or editing.
    —Carrie Cuinn, Publisher on 01 May 2011

    Q: What is a day in the life of an editor like for you? [ See other editors' answers to this question ]

    A: Much of my week is spent working at my dayjob, or spending time with my family. I steal hours from whatever place can spare them - meaning that in order to read, write, and edit, I give up quite a lot of sleep.
    —Carrie Cuinn, Publisher on 01 May 2011

    Q: How important do you feel it is for publishers to embrace modern technologies? [ See other editors' answers to this question ]

    A: We accept email submissions, maintain websites, have Twitter feeds and Facebook pages dedicated both to Dagan Books proper and various individual titles, and use both PoD and traditional print services. While we would never give up the printed word, we find a great story reads just as well on an e-reader too.
    —Carrie Cuinn, Publisher on 01 May 2011[url][/url]

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